Confirmation of an association between single nucleotide polymorphisms in the VDR gene with respiratory syncytial virus related disease in South African Children

T. L. Kresfelder, R. Janssen, L. Bont, M. Venter

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65 Citaten (Scopus)

Samenvatting

Respiratory syncytial virus is a leading cause of lower respiratory tract infection in infants. Disease severity has been linked to host immune responses and polymorphisms in genes associated with innate immunity. A large-scale genetics study of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in children in the Netherlands identified SNPs in the vitamin D receptor (VDR) and JUN genes which have a strong association with an increased risk of developing bronchiolitis following the first respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection. The Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) gene has two SNPs which have been associated previously with RSV disease severity in various populations. The aim of this study was to determine if these SNPs may be associated with RSV disease in African children in South Africa. RSV patient (n=296) and control (n=113) groups were established (median ages: 3 and 3.5 months) and DNA extracted from the collected specimens. Real-time polymerase chain reaction using hydrolysis probes was used to screen for SNPs in the VDR (Thr1Meth; rs10735810), TLR4 (Asp299Gly; rs4986790 and Thr399Ile; rs4986791) and JUN (c.750G/A; rs11688) genes. Carriers of the VDR (Thr1Meth) SNP minor T allele were more prone to RSV disease than individuals in the control group. The TLR4 (Asp299Gly), TLR4 (Thr399Ile), and JUN (c.750G/A) SNPs showed no significant association with RSV disease. It is concluded that children carrying the minor T allele of the VDR (Thr1Meth) SNP may be predisposed to RSV disease, as this SNP was identified as a risk factor for severe RSV disease in South African children, confirming the findings in the Netherlands.

Originele taal-2Engels
Pagina's (van-tot)1834-1840
Aantal pagina's7
TijdschriftJournal of Medical Virology
Volume83
Nummer van het tijdschrift10
DOI's
StatusGepubliceerd - okt. 2011
Extern gepubliceerdJa

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