Relapse, not regimen-related toxicity, was the major cause of treatment failure in 11 children with Down syndrome undergoing haematopoietic stem cell transplantation for acute leukaemia

B. Meissner, A. Borkhardt, D. Dilloo, D. Fuchs, W. Friedrich, R. Handgretinger, C. Peters, A. Schrauder, F. R. Schuster, J. Vormoor, B. Maecker, K. W. Sykora, F. Zintl, K. Welte, M. Sauer

Onderzoeksoutput: Bijdrage aan tijdschriftArtikelpeer review

25 Citaten (Scopus)

Samenvatting

We report a retrospective analysis of 11 children with Down syndrome (DS) treated by SCT in eight German-Austrian SCT centres. Indications for transplantation were acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (N = 8) and acute myeloid leukaemia (N = 3). A reduced intensity conditioning (RIC) containing 2 Gy TBI was given to two patients, another five received a myeloablative regimen with 12 Gy TBI. Treosulphan or busulphan was used in the remaining four children. Four of eleven (36%) patients are alive. All of them were treated with a myeloablative regimen. One of the four surviving children relapsed 9 months after SCT and is currently receiving palliative outpatient treatment. The main cause of death was relapse (5-11). Two children died of regimen-related toxicity (RRT), one from severe exfoliative dermatitis and multiorgan failure after a treosulphan-containing regimen, the other from GvHD-related infections after RIC. Acute GvHD of the skin was observed in 10 of 10 evaluable patients, and chronic GvHD in 4 of 8. Our data show that DS patients can tolerate commonly used, fully myeloablative preparative regimens. The major cause of death is relapse rather than RRT resulting in an event-free survival of 18% and over all survival of 36%.

Originele taal-2Engels
Pagina's (van-tot)945-949
Aantal pagina's5
TijdschriftBone Marrow Transplantation
Volume40
Nummer van het tijdschrift10
DOI's
StatusGepubliceerd - nov. 2007
Extern gepubliceerdJa

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