Short and Long-Term Parental Posttraumatic Stress After a Child’s Accident: Prevalence and Associated Factors

Els P.M. van Meijel, Maj R. Gigengack, Eva Verlinden, Alida F.W. van der Steeg, J. Carel Goslings, Frank W. Bloemers, Jan S.K. Luitse, Frits Boer, Martha A. Grootenhuis, Ramón J.L. Lindauer

Onderzoeksoutput: Bijdrage aan tijdschriftArtikelpeer review

4 Citaten (Scopus)

Samenvatting

Studies on the long-term prevalence of parental posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) following child accidental injury are scarce, and findings on risk factors vary. In this follow-up study (T2, n = 69) we determined the prevalence of parental PTSS 2–4 years after accidental injury of their child, compared with 3 months after the accident (T1, n = 135). Additionally, we examined the association between parental and child factors and PTSS severity. Children were 8–18 years old at the time of the accident. Parent and child PTSS was assessed by self-report. Other data were retrieved from medical records and a telephone interview. Parental PTSS was 9.6% at T1 and 5.8% at T2. Acute parental stress as measured within 2 weeks of the child’s accident was significantly associated with parental PTSS severity (T1 and T2), as was the child’s hospitalization of more than 1 day at T1 and the child’s permanent physical impairment at T2. To prevent adverse long-term psychological consequences we recommend identifying and monitoring parents at risk and offering them timely treatment.

Originele taal-2Engels
Pagina's (van-tot)200-208
Aantal pagina's9
TijdschriftChild Psychiatry and Human Development
Volume51
Nummer van het tijdschrift2
DOI's
StatusGepubliceerd - 1 apr. 2020

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